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Adeola Ogunmola Sowemimo – THE FIRST NIGERIA FEMALE PILOT WITH QATAR AIRWAYS

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In Doha, Adeola Ogunmola Sowemimo, a Nigerian female pilot etched a record of her own working for a world-class Air-Line. She is the first Nigeria female pilot to be hired by Qatar Airways and she will be flying the big bird, the Dreamliner Boeing 787.

Over the years, Nigerian women have proven that they are capable of achieving incredible feats across all industries and this is the case of Adeola Ogunmola Sowemimo, who becomes the First Nigerian Female Pilot at Qatar Airways likewise the First Nigerian Female Pilot on the Gigantic Boeing 787 Dreamliner Aircraft.

Sowemimo, an indigene of Ogbomosho, an ancient town in Oyo State. Married to Seun Funmi Olamilekan Sowemimo on the 22 day of April, 2017. A marriage that is blessed with kids, a true inspiration for Nigerian women to pursue their dreams despite having a family. The graduate of  Ladoke Akintola University, which is also based in the old city.

In 1978, Chinyere Kalu was recorded the first Nigerian female commercial pilot in 1978, thereby making her part of the first wave of African female pilots but not the first female pilot in Africa. The place of the female pilot in African social-political context is subjective. One account has it that Ghanaian Millicent Melody Danquah was the first female pilot after she flew solo for the first time in a de Havilland Canada DHC -1 Chipmunk Aircraft in 1964. Making her prominent as the first female African aviator.

For African women, History shows that it took a very long time for them to enjoy basic human rights. Through the fight of equality and provision of human rights and privileges to women in society, they have proven that they are a force to reckon with and a set back is no reason not to rise as fast as they can. They have also proven that they are capable of achieving incredible feats across many industries.

In recent times, African women are leading and dominating the spaces they find themselves but only a few are waves in male-dominated industries. Many trailblazers have accomplished in the field of sports, business, medicine and so on. Now, a Nigerian trailblazer Adeola Ogunmola Sowemimo has emerged in the aviation industry just like our own Ngozi Okonjo Iweala in the global financial sector.

Like Danquah and Kalu, cited earlier, a wave of positive acknowledgment, praise and congratulatory messages have continued to trail the announcement of Sowemimo. She had taken to her Facebook page to thank God for His mercy. She wrote: “It is the Lord’s doing and its marvelous in my sight” caught in the euphoria of her moment, the Orlando, Florida based pilot further posted a picture of herself as a student of Sunrise Aviation Academy U.S on Facebook with the caption “Days of little beginning … God be praised #Ihavedominion”.

On seeing her post, friends and family members on the platform also celebrated her for the great achievement, thanking God for granting her the abilities to achieve it. Other well-meaning Nigerians also followed suit on social media to heap praises on her for the stunning milestone. One of such is Arunma Oteh, a former World Bank Vice-President, who gave Sowemimo the applause with the tweet: Congratulations Captain Adeola Ogunmola Sowemimo, making Nigeria proud. President Okonkwo @IkechukwuQwu wrote first Nigeria female pilot will Qatar Airways, Mrs. Adeola Ogunmola Sowemimo flying the Dreamliner Boeing 787. Congrats Captain!

Headquartered in the Qatar Airways Tower in Doha, Qatar Airline Operates a hub -and-spoke network, linking over 150 international destinations across African, central Asia, Europe, far East, South Asia, America and Oceania, using a fleet of more than 200 aircraft.

Even though the Middle East is home to some of the world’s biggest and most recognizable airlines like emirates and Etihad, it’s reputed as an extremely challenging region for women hoping to set into the cockpit. The state-owned national carrier of Qatar is one of the first in the region to introduce female pilots with women accounting for 44 percent of the airline’s workforce as at 2018, according to its Executive Officer Akbar Al Baker.   

Piece contributed by Kine Ivere    

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2019 International Women’s Day: Six Women who shaped the World Order

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Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala – Nigeria makes the list

Today is International Women’s Day. This day of recognition shines a spotlight on the achievements of women past and present. It was formally established in 1975, when the United Nations celebrated International Women’s Year and held the first World Conference on Women in Mexico City. However, the day’s origins can be traced back to the first decade of the twentieth century and the women’s labor and suffrage movements.

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World Order Women’s Political Leadership History and Theory of International Relations Diplomacy and International Institutions Human Rights

All too often women and their stories are edited out of history. However, women have played critical roles in forging the contemporary world and the international institutions that help govern it. Thanks to women, we gained—among other fixtures—the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the first treaty to articulate the fundamental human rights that should be universally protected. Eleanor Roosevelt steered the treaty through a tumultuous drafting and adoption process; Hansa Mehta, Minerva Bernardino, and Bodil Begtrup insisted upon inclusive language that referred to “humans” instead of “men”; and women such as Begum Shaista Ikramullah, Evdokia Uralova, and Marie-Helene Lefaucheux pushed for it to address women’s issues such as marriage and equal pay. Furthermore, women such as Hannah Arendt, Marie Colvin, and Elena Poniatowska have challenged us to understand the world in new ways. And in recent years Margaret Chan, Christine Lagarde, Angela Merkel, and Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka have changed the face of leadership.

Today, in honor of International Women’s Day, we highlight just a few of the women whose contributions have helped to shape world order into its present form.

Mabel Newcomer. Dr. Mabel Newcomer was a respected economist, passionate educator, and prolific writer. From 1917 to 1957, she taught economics at Vassar College, where she was known as the best “tax man” of those years. In addition to teaching, Newcomer served as the first female vice president of the American Economic Association and as a consultant to the U.S. Treasury. In 1944, she represented the United States at the UN Monetary and Financial Conference at Bretton Woods. She was the only American woman at the conference that would establish the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, later to grow into the World Bank. At the meetings on the IMF, Newcomer was the only woman at the table, though not the only woman in the room. The other women present sat behind male delegates as expert consultants. After the conference, Newcomer helped sell the program to American women, and traveled throughout the country speaking to many groups, contributing to the success of the institutions that have been essential in managing the world economy.

Doris Stevens. Doris Stevens was a champion for women’s rights both at home and abroad. Stevens was a prominent organizer and leader within the American suffrage movement. Though she was arrested multiple times, she remained committed to her cause. In 1922, the suffragists secured the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, and Stevens turned her attention to international women’s rights and legal status. She was appointed as the inaugural chair of the Inter-American Commission of Women (IACW), the first intergovernmental agency established to ensure recognition of women’s human rights. During her tenure, the IACW meticulously documented how laws around the world codified gender inequality. In 1933, this work yielded the Convention on the Nationality of Women, which was the first international instrument adopted concerning the rights of women. The treaty ensured a woman’s right to retain her own nationality in the event of marriage to a man of another nationality. Decades later, women around the world continue her fight for legal equality.

Gro Harlem Brundtland. Beyond becoming the first woman and youngest individual to hold the office of Norwegian prime minister, Dr. Gro Harlem Brundtland played an essential role in popularizing the idea of sustainable development. In 1983, the UN General Assembly established the World Commission on Environment and Development and mandated it, among other items, “to propose long-term environmental strategies for achieving sustainable development to the year 2000 and beyond.” Brundtland chaired this commission and oversaw the three years of deliberations that produced its seminal report, Our Common Future [PDF]. The findings of the Brundtland Report, as it came to be known, have served as a foundation for much of the United Nations’ subsequent work on environment and development, including the 1992 Rio Earth Summit and, more recently, the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals. The concept of sustainable development articulated in its pages has gained currency well beyond the halls of multilateral institutions, becoming a twenty-first century global social, cultural, economic, and political touchstone.

Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala. While some international institutions, like the Brundtland Commission, have had women at their helm, others have proved more recalcitrant to female leaders. One such institution, the World Bank, saw cracks in its glass ceiling in 2012, when Dr. Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala ran to become its president. After serving terms as Nigeria’s foreign affairs minister and finance minister, and then as a managing director at the bank, she (and Colombia’s Jose Antonio Ocampo) squared off against American physician Jim Yong Kim in the bank’s first-ever contested presidential selection. Historically, a longstanding transatlantic gentlemen’s agreement has put an American in charge of the bank and a European in charge of the IMF as a fait accompli. Okonjo-Iweala helped to challenge that non-meritocratic status quo with her candidacy. Although unsuccessful, she put up fierce opposition and laid the groundwork for future challenges from non-Americans, especially from developing countries. With the World Bank presidency now up for grabs once again and the controversial David Malpass as the U.S. nominee, Okonjo-Iweala has garnered attention as a potential alternative. As the current chair of the board of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, and an influential figure on the world stage, she will remain an inspiration for women across the globe regardless of whether she assumes the mantle of World Bank president.

Jody Williams. For decades, Jody Williams has been one of the world’s most effective peace advocates. In 1997, Williams and the International Coalition to Ban Landmines (ICBL) jointly received the Nobel Peace Prize for their work to ban landmines. Williams was first exposed to landmines’ devastation during her work in El Salvador in the 1980s. As an aid worker, she was responsible for providing prosthetic arms and legs to children who had lost limbs to mines. She returned to the United States, and in 1991 began working with ICBL as its chief strategist and spokesperson. Williams was a triple threat: she had a flair for activsim, was an effective organizer, and did not mind if people found her difficult. Within six years, she had grown the coalition to some 1,300 organizations across ninety-five countries. In December 1997, ICBL achieved a major victory when world leaders gathered in Ottawa, Canada, to sign the Mine Ban Treaty, which bans the production, use, stockpiling or transport of antipersonnel mines. Although these weapons still exist, the treaty contributed to a strong norm against their use. Ever the activist, Williams continues to work toward peace. In addition to her work with the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots, she co-chairs the Nobel Women’s Initiative, and has joined with fellow survivors of sexual assault in lobbying world leaders to end sexual violence in conflict.

Lise Meitner. Science, alongside politics, is one of the most powerful forces shaping the modern world. Dr. Lise Meitner, a prolific and pathbreaking Austrian physicist, had a profound influence on both. She was a critical member of the team that first unlocked the potential of the atom, a structure central to international politics since World War II. After her colleague Otto Hahn’s bombardment of uranium with neutrons in 1938 yielded barium isotopes, Meitner correctly inferred that the splitting of the atomic nucleus—nuclear fission—was responsible. She and her nephew Otto Frisch articulated the process through which this occurred, leading scientists to surmise that a fissile chain reaction would release enormous amounts of energy, generating an explosion of immense power. Although Meitner, who had fled to Sweden due to her Jewish lineage, had made a contribution integral to the development of the atomic bomb, she refused to participate in the subsequent Manhattan Project. The Nobel Committee overlooked her several years later, when it awarded the 1944 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Otto Hahn “for his discovery of the fission of heavy nuclei.” Meitner’s personal legacy, then, is one of profound humanity, having escaped the atrocities of Nazi Europe and abstained from the making of the bomb only to see her genius employed toward the destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and bring the world to the knife’s edge during the Cold War.
The Way Forward
The women highlighted here represent only a small proportion of the women who have worked across borders to build a more peaceful, prosperous, and equal world. Their already challenging work was made even more daunting by the barriers—legal, economic, and social—that they had to overcome in order to do their work. Today, in addition to honoring these women and their achievements, we should take a clear-eyed look at the barriers that remain intact and double-down on efforts to dismantle them. A generation of young women waits to engage in the hard work of changing the world, and it is our responsibility to make it easier for them to do so.
Piece by Rebecca Hughes, research associate for Women and Foreign Policy, and Kyle L. Evanoff, research associate for International Institutions and Global Governance, at the Council on Foreign Relations.

Doris Stevens. Doris Stevens was a champion for women’s rights both at home and abroad. Stevens was a prominent organizer and leader within the American suffrage movement. Though she was arrested multiple times, she remained committed to her cause. In 1922, the suffragists secured the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, and Stevens turned her attention to international women’s rights and legal status. She was appointed as the inaugural chair of the Inter-American Commission of Women (IACW), the first intergovernmental agency established to ensure recognition of women’s human rights. During her tenure, the IACW meticulously documented how laws around the world codified gender inequality. In 1933, this work yielded the Convention on the Nationality of Women, which was the first international instrument adopted concerning the rights of women. The treaty ensured a woman’s right to retain her own nationality in the event of marriage to a man of another nationality. Decades later, women around the world continue her fight for legal equality.
Gro Harlem Brundtland. Beyond becoming the first woman and youngest individual to hold the office of Norwegian prime minister, Dr. Gro Harlem Brundtland played an essential role in popularizing the idea of sustainable development. In 1983, the UN General Assembly established the World Commission on Environment and Development and mandated it, among other items, “to propose long-term environmental strategies for achieving sustainable development to the year 2000 and beyond.” Brundtland chaired this commission and oversaw the three years of deliberations that produced its seminal report, Our Common Future [PDF]. The findings of the Brundtland Report, as it came to be known, have served as a foundation for much of the United Nations’ subsequent work on environment and development, including the 1992 Rio Earth Summit and, more recently, the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals. The concept of sustainable development articulated in its pages has gained currency well beyond the halls of multilateral institutions, becoming a twenty-first century global social, cultural, economic, and political touchstone.
Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala. While some international institutions, like the Brundtland Commission, have had women at their helm, others have proved more recalcitrant to female leaders. One such institution, the World Bank, saw cracks in its glass ceiling in 2012, when Dr. Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala ran to become its president. After serving terms as Nigeria’s foreign affairs minister and finance minister, and then as a managing director at the bank, she (and Colombia’s Jose Antonio Ocampo) squared off against American physician Jim Yong Kim in the bank’s first-ever contested presidential selection. Historically, a longstanding transatlantic gentlemen’s agreement has put an American in charge of the bank and a European in charge of the IMF as a fait accompli. Okonjo-Iweala helped to challenge that non-meritocratic status quo with her candidacy. Although unsuccessful, she put up fierce opposition and laid the groundwork for future challenges from non-Americans, especially from developing countries. With the World Bank presidency now up for grabs once again and the controversial David Malpass as the U.S. nominee, Okonjo-Iweala has garnered attention as a potential alternative. As the current chair of the board of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, and an influential figure on the world stage, she will remain an inspiration for women across the globe regardless of whether she assumes the mantle of World Bank president.
Jody Williams. For decades, Jody Williams has been one of the world’s most effective peace advocates. In 1997, Williams and the International Coalition to Ban Landmines (ICBL) jointly received the Nobel Peace Prize for their work to ban landmines. Williams was first exposed to landmines’ devastation during her work in El Salvador in the 1980s. As an aid worker, she was responsible for providing prosthetic arms and legs to children who had lost limbs to mines. She returned to the United States, and in 1991 began working with ICBL as its chief strategist and spokesperson. Williams was a triple threat: she had a flair for activsim, was an effective organizer, and did not mind if people found her difficult. Within six years, she had grown the coalition to some 1,300 organizations across ninety-five countries. In December 1997, ICBL achieved a major victory when world leaders gathered in Ottawa, Canada, to sign the Mine Ban Treaty, which bans the production, use, stockpiling or transport of antipersonnel mines. Although these weapons still exist, the treaty contributed to a strong norm against their use. Ever the activist, Williams continues to work toward peace. In addition to her work with the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots, she co-chairs the Nobel Women’s Initiative, and has joined with fellow survivors of sexual assault in lobbying world leaders to end sexual violence in conflict.
Lise Meitner. Science, alongside politics, is one of the most powerful forces shaping the modern world. Dr. Lise Meitner, a prolific and pathbreaking Austrian physicist, had a profound influence on both. She was a critical member of the team that first unlocked the potential of the atom, a structure central to international politics since World War II. After her colleague Otto Hahn’s bombardment of uranium with neutrons in 1938 yielded barium isotopes, Meitner correctly inferred that the splitting of the atomic nucleus—nuclear fission—was responsible. She and her nephew Otto Frisch articulated the process through which this occurred, leading scientists to surmise that a fissile chain reaction would release enormous amounts of energy, generating an explosion of immense power. Although Meitner, who had fled to Sweden due to her Jewish lineage, had made a contribution integral to the development of the atomic bomb, she refused to participate in the subsequent Manhattan Project. The Nobel Committee overlooked her several years later, when it awarded the 1944 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Otto Hahn “for his discovery of the fission of heavy nuclei.” Meitner’s personal legacy, then, is one of profound humanity, having escaped the atrocities of Nazi Europe and abstained from the making of the bomb only to see her genius employed toward the destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and bring the world to the knife’s edge during the Cold War.
The Way Forward
The women highlighted here represent only a small proportion of the women who have worked across borders to build a more peaceful, prosperous, and equal world. Their already challenging work was made even more daunting by the barriers—legal, economic, and social—that they had to overcome in order to do their work. Today, in addition to honoring these women and their achievements, we should take a clear-eyed look at the barriers that remain intact and double-down on efforts to dismantle them. A generation of young women waits to engage in the hard work of changing the world, and it is our responsibility to make it easier for them to do so.
Piece by Rebecca Hughes, research associate for Women and Foreign Policy, and Kyle L. Evanoff, research associate for International Institutions and Global Governance, at the Council on Foreign Relations.

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Dr. Steve Olusegun Ogidan, fma, FIMC, FNIM, MNIPR

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Leader in Microfinance and Agriculture Development

PROFILE OF DR. STEVE OLUSEGUN OGIDAN,

Dr Steve Olusegun OGIDAN is an employer of labour, a self-motivated and hard-working strategy expert and development planner, with experience in agriculture, rural development and microfinance, as well as human resources development. A goal-directed, results-oriented individual with a strong and varied background and education in poverty management, capacity building, HR Solutions, Micro-insurance, Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises (MSMEs) and Strategy for organizational development. 

Dr Ogidan has a BA Education Degree from the Ahmadu Bello University Zaria, Nigeria, Masters Degree from the University of Lagos Nigeria and PhD in Business Development from the Trinity College and University, Spain. He was also trained at the International Training Centre of the International Labour Organization, ITC/ILO, Turin, Italy, Vaikuth Mehta National Institute, Pune, India and the NEGEV Institute of Strategies in Beer Sheva, Israel.

He is presently the National Coordinating Consultant to NIRSAL Plc Project Monitoring Reporting and Remediation Offices nationwide to the Nigeria Incentive-based Risk Sharing System for Agricultural Lending (NIRSAL), which is an innovative mechanism, targeted at de-risking lending to the agricultural sector. It is designed to provide the singular transformational and one bullet solution to break the seeming jinx in Nigeria’s agricultural lending and development and also Team Leader on the IFAD/VCDP Strengthening Farmers Organisation Project in Ogun State.

Dr Ogidan is an able and effective team leader, an efficient and effective strategic planner, researcher, excellent trainer and communicator at all levels within and outside organizations with good problem solving and analytical skills. Specific interests include business development, strategy formulation, HR Solutions, training and participatory research. Proven leadership skills including managing and motivating others to achieve objectives, strategic planning, change management and process re-engineering and analytical skills. He is very fluent with information technology.

He was the Team Leader for unprecedented three terms for the 1st, 2nd and 3rd FGN/IFAD-RUFIN Supervision Missions for Nigeria between 2010 and 2013. He was a consultant to the UNDP and the Central Bank of Nigeria on Microfinance Development Strategy. He was part of the team that designed the Microfinance Certification Programme for Nigeria. He was also a Strategy Consultant to the Supreme Court of Nigeria 2011-2014 and the UNDP Nigeria and Africa Regional Office on Facility for Inclusive Market and many others.

Dr Ogidan is an accredited OPTMA Trainer, Trainer by Centre for Management Development, Nigeria and the Institute of Management Consultants, Nigeria. He is an accredited trainer by the International Labour Organization ILO/ITC to deliver its programme on Making Microfinance Work, MMW in Africa.  He is also an accredited Trainer of the Women’s World Banking WWB to deliver Microfinance Management Development Trainings of the Centre for Microfinance Leadership (CML). He is also accredited by PrOpCom (Promoting Pro-poor Opportunities in Commodity and Service Markets) a DFID initiative, as a training consultant and service provider. He is a capacity building Consultant to International Fertilizer Development Centre, IFDC, USA and worked on Rice, Sorghum, Maize, Ginger, Groundnut and Soybean in Kaduna, Kano and Katsina States of Nigeria; project sponsored by Strategic Alliance for Agricultural Development in Africa (SAADA), funded by the Directorate of General International Cooperation (DGIS) of the Netherlands; He is also currently a consultant with the UK Department for International Development (DFID) ENABLE programme assisting in building Business Membership Organizations (BMO’s) capacity for advocacy. He is a member of the ITC/ILO International Team developing Training Curriculum and Manuals on Access to Finance for African Workers and Trade Unions in Africa 2010- 2012.

In partnership with Making Cents International, Dr Ogidan is certified to deliver the Youth-Inclusive Financial Services, YFSanother product to deepen the outreach of Microfinance in developing world. Implementing Sound Practices in Youth-Inclusive Financial Services provides microfinance practitioners and youth enterprise and livelihoods practitioners’ critical overview of today’s relevance of financial services to youth in the developing world and how to design and implement interventions to expand youth-inclusive financial services. He served as a Strategy Consultant to the Central Bank of Liberia and facilitated the transformation of Microfinance Unit of the CBL to Inclusive Finance Department, project sponsored by the UNCDF.

Dr Ogidan has also completed the European Union Project as a Master Trainer on the Water Supply and Sanitation Sector Reform (WSSSR) programme aims at providing support to institutional and policy reform and demonstrating innovative approaches to service delivery, including implementation of water supply and sanitation projects co-financed with the government. Dr Ogidan was recruited by PricewaterhouseCoopers Nigeria and handled the Training and HR components of the project implemented by PricewaterhouseCoopers in a Consortium of 3 firms namely:  ITAD Limited, UK – Consortium Leader, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Nigeria, Mott MacDonald, UK

He was also the BDS/Grant Management Specialist on the World Bank Rice Value Chain Project in Kaduna in 2008-2010: a World Bank/FGN Programme under the leadership of Dr Rama Rao Vellanki. He is currently the Kaduna State Coordinator of the World Bank State-Level Private Sector Policy And Institutional-Mapping (SPPIM) project. Dr Ogidan was a consultant to UNDP Nigeria on Microfinance as part of the National Experts on Microfinance Baseline Survey Team and the Development of New Microfinance Development Strategy, NMDS for Nigeria. He was a Consultant to the Central Bank of Nigeria and the GTZ on Microfinance Curriculum Development and Training. He is an accredited CBN Microfinance Training Service Provider (MTSP) training Microfinance Bankers in Northern Nigeria.

A Commonwealth Scholar at the National Institute of Cooperative Management, Pune, India (1994), a MASHAV (Government of Israel) Scholar at the NEGEV Institute for Strategies of Peace and Development (NISPED), Beer Sheva, Israel (2006) and a MasterCard Foundation Scholar at the School of Applied Microfinance, Kenya, 2008. He is also member of the Institute of Management Consultants IMC. Dr Ogidan is a Faculty Member in the School of Applied Microfinance, Mombasa, Kenya and The Enterprise Development Centre (EDC) of the Pan African University, (Lagos Business School) and a Strategy Development Expert for EDS in Cuttington University, Monrovia, Liberia.

His passion for agriculture and microfinance led him to make  incursions into several African countries as he led the team on the establishment of Togo Incentive-based Risk Sharing System for Agricultural Lending, International Consultant and Strategy Expert to the Central Bank of Liberia on Inclusive Finance, 2012. He was the Team Leader Rest of Africa Engagement, NIRSAL Plc to Togo, Rwanda, Sudan and Morocco

He is also the lead consultant facilitating the establishment of a nation-wide microfinance bank midwife by NIRSAL Plc – NIRSAL Microfinance Bank which recently commenced operations across the length and breadth of Nigeria.

Dr Ogidan who is the MD/CEO of Successory Nigeria Ltd, Beresh Consulting and Chairman, Global Knowledge Group also chairs the Board of Directors of a Microfinance Bank while providing management assistance to a number of Microfinance Banks and Businesses across Nigeria, Kenya, Ghana, Liberia, the Gambia, South Africa and the Royal Kingdom of Morocco. He is also a Fellow of the Microfinance Association of the United Kingdom. He is married with children.

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